Tips for maximum results

Tips for maximum results

Instructions for doing your releases will always entail that you focus on the sights, sounds, and smells — your overall senses — of your experience with the trauma.

It’s important for you to do this because your memories are stored that way in your brain, so this process works best when you focus enough to trigger memories. This does not mean you must relive the entire traumatic event in your mind as you complete the process. 

As an example, if you cut yourself and went to the clinic for stitches, you only have to focus on the sight of the blood, the pain, and the smell of the disinfectant they put on it to get the entire memory. You would say in statement two, “I release the energetic connection to and the feelings of the trauma of my cut, my stitches, and the pain I felt.”

A traumatic event as simple as a cut can be released in one session. However, some traumas are much more complicated and include many events that happened over time. To make the process easier, you will always be instructed to break down more complicated traumas into periods of time or individual events. Any trauma that has built up over time needs to be addressed in multiple sessions so you can adjust to each session before you move forward.

In the trials, the four percent that experienced an increased emotional reaction all had one thing in common: they tried to process a lifetime of trauma in a single sitting. For example, one woman tried to process her dad never loving her in one session. Another tried to process the negative effect of a guilt-based religion on his life.

Let’s use a ten-year abusive relationship as an example. The first session would ideally involve focusing on the beginning of the relationship, especially with any commitment like a marriage or moving in together and the first few years thereafter. 

You would focus on the memories of you and your partner getting together and any abuse that occurred in the first three years. If the abuse is verbal, the sound of their angry voice or demeaning comments will trigger memories. 

If the abuse is verbal and physical (including sexual), you will need to focus on the voice plus the actual events, including the sight of any marks or bruises, along with the associated pain and fear of the abuse. 

During step two you’d say, “I release the energetic connection to and the feelings of the trauma, of any trauma that resulted from me deciding to have a relationship with (your partner’s name), and any trauma and fear and abuse I experienced during our first three years together.” Record your response in your journal. 

The next release would cover the same kind of events in years three to six. Only this time you would say, “I release the energetic connection to and the feelings of the trauma, of any trauma that resulted from me staying in a relationship with (your partner’s name), and any trauma and abuse I experienced during our third through sixth years together.” Record your response in your journal. 

The last release would cover breakup or divorce memories, the fear you felt when leaving, any legal or court hearings, disentanglement of assets and possessions, child custody agreements, and any fear of making it on your own. You would say, “I release the energetic connection to and the feelings of the trauma, of any trauma that resulted from me leaving my relationship with (your partner’s name), and any trauma and abuse I experienced during our final years together, including all the trauma and fear related to getting away from that abusive relationship.” Record your response in your journal. 

After the final session, you may want to review all of your sessions. You can pick specific memories of events that still may generate a negative emotional reaction and release them again if you’re not feeling calm and neutral about them.

[jwp-video]

Leave a Reply